Auras and Levitations
Auras and Levitations
+

Lorna SimpsonAmerican, born 1960Wigs (portfolio)  1994waterless lithograph on feltCollection Walker Art CenterT. B. Walker Acquisition Fund, 1995
more info: http://www.walkerart.org/archive/9/B7838DD567B1D4546174.htm
+

Alessandra Spranzi
+

Alessandra Spranzi

Alessandra Spranzi

Alessandra Spranzi

Alessandra Spranzi

Alessandra Spranzi

Alessandra Spranzi
+
laiaarguelles:

Laia ArguellesZaragoza, März 2014

 
+
gravellyrun:

Susan Hiller Study for Homage to Yves Klein: Levitations
+
photographicpictures:

R.I.P. David Weiss (1946 - 2012) 
Peter Fischli and David Weiss -  The Three Sisters (1984)
+
midnightmartinis:

berlin, 1914 - getty images
+
rudygodinez:

Christian Haake, White Elephant,  (2011)
These empty shops and closed arcades are all models built by the Bremen-based artist, Christian Haake. They formed part of his exhibition, White Elephant held at Gesellschaft fur Aktuelle Kunst (GAK) in Bremen in 2011. Passage, the almost life-size installation of a single shop front devoid of goods, provided the setting for the viewing of his film White Elephant, which presents a tracking shot through a seemingly endless parade of empty shops, in a closed, but strangely spotless, 1960’s era shopping arcade. The deep set windows still insistently drawing our eye into where the goods, the color, the stuff of the everyday should be, these abandoned shops seem particularly mutely expressive of absence. The reduced scale of Passage presents a bleached out, distilled and compressed simulacrum of reality – more ordered, less messy. One that seems dangerously near a void: an emptiness deeper that that just of shelves and interiors. Walter Benjamin’s Baudelairean flâneurwould have a bit of an existential crisis in this arcade.
rudygodinez:

Christian Haake, White Elephant,  (2011)
These empty shops and closed arcades are all models built by the Bremen-based artist, Christian Haake. They formed part of his exhibition, White Elephant held at Gesellschaft fur Aktuelle Kunst (GAK) in Bremen in 2011. Passage, the almost life-size installation of a single shop front devoid of goods, provided the setting for the viewing of his film White Elephant, which presents a tracking shot through a seemingly endless parade of empty shops, in a closed, but strangely spotless, 1960’s era shopping arcade. The deep set windows still insistently drawing our eye into where the goods, the color, the stuff of the everyday should be, these abandoned shops seem particularly mutely expressive of absence. The reduced scale of Passage presents a bleached out, distilled and compressed simulacrum of reality – more ordered, less messy. One that seems dangerously near a void: an emptiness deeper that that just of shelves and interiors. Walter Benjamin’s Baudelairean flâneurwould have a bit of an existential crisis in this arcade.
rudygodinez:

Christian Haake, White Elephant,  (2011)
These empty shops and closed arcades are all models built by the Bremen-based artist, Christian Haake. They formed part of his exhibition, White Elephant held at Gesellschaft fur Aktuelle Kunst (GAK) in Bremen in 2011. Passage, the almost life-size installation of a single shop front devoid of goods, provided the setting for the viewing of his film White Elephant, which presents a tracking shot through a seemingly endless parade of empty shops, in a closed, but strangely spotless, 1960’s era shopping arcade. The deep set windows still insistently drawing our eye into where the goods, the color, the stuff of the everyday should be, these abandoned shops seem particularly mutely expressive of absence. The reduced scale of Passage presents a bleached out, distilled and compressed simulacrum of reality – more ordered, less messy. One that seems dangerously near a void: an emptiness deeper that that just of shelves and interiors. Walter Benjamin’s Baudelairean flâneurwould have a bit of an existential crisis in this arcade.
rudygodinez:

Christian Haake, White Elephant,  (2011)
These empty shops and closed arcades are all models built by the Bremen-based artist, Christian Haake. They formed part of his exhibition, White Elephant held at Gesellschaft fur Aktuelle Kunst (GAK) in Bremen in 2011. Passage, the almost life-size installation of a single shop front devoid of goods, provided the setting for the viewing of his film White Elephant, which presents a tracking shot through a seemingly endless parade of empty shops, in a closed, but strangely spotless, 1960’s era shopping arcade. The deep set windows still insistently drawing our eye into where the goods, the color, the stuff of the everyday should be, these abandoned shops seem particularly mutely expressive of absence. The reduced scale of Passage presents a bleached out, distilled and compressed simulacrum of reality – more ordered, less messy. One that seems dangerously near a void: an emptiness deeper that that just of shelves and interiors. Walter Benjamin’s Baudelairean flâneurwould have a bit of an existential crisis in this arcade.
+
rudygodinez:

Dieter Roth, Untitled, Self Portrait in Four Parts, (1971)
(from top)
1)   Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #1)
 2)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #2)
 3)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #3)
 4)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #4)
Four Images that appear to be identical at first glance, until you notice the “building” of Roth’s shadowy identity in the lower left hand corner of each successive print.
rudygodinez:

Dieter Roth, Untitled, Self Portrait in Four Parts, (1971)
(from top)
1)   Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #1)
 2)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #2)
 3)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #3)
 4)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #4)
Four Images that appear to be identical at first glance, until you notice the “building” of Roth’s shadowy identity in the lower left hand corner of each successive print.
rudygodinez:

Dieter Roth, Untitled, Self Portrait in Four Parts, (1971)
(from top)
1)   Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #1)
 2)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #2)
 3)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #3)
 4)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #4)
Four Images that appear to be identical at first glance, until you notice the “building” of Roth’s shadowy identity in the lower left hand corner of each successive print.
rudygodinez:

Dieter Roth, Untitled, Self Portrait in Four Parts, (1971)
(from top)
1)   Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #1)
 2)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #2)
 3)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #3)
 4)  Untitled (Self Portrait “B” #4)
Four Images that appear to be identical at first glance, until you notice the “building” of Roth’s shadowy identity in the lower left hand corner of each successive print.
+
rudygodinez:

Richard Serra, Laying out “To Encircle Base Plate Hexagram, Right Angles Inverted”, (1970)
Ueno Park, Tokyo